News Releases

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Archive: 2022
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  • September

    Corps’ hurricane response mission finds new home in Portland

    As Hurricane Ian made landfall in Florida Sept. 28, more than a dozen volunteers with the Portland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers prepared for a new mission: taking calls from those affected by the natural disaster.
  • Winter recreational lock schedule begins Sept. 15 on Lower Columbia

    Motorized recreational boaters who need to pass through the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ (Corps’) three lower Columbia River dams must do so during daylight hours only, upon request, Sept. 15 through May 14, 2023.
  • 9,200 buckets later, Corps dredging halfway complete at Gold Beach

    A giant bucket – the size of a 1970s Volkswagen bus – swings through the air after it gobbles up 20 cubic yards of gravel blocking (shoaling-in) access to parts of the Port of Gold Beach, Ore. The small community on the southern coast, where the Rogue River meets the Pacific Ocean, doesn’t have much, but it has a port that sees upwards of 35,000 visitors per year for jet boat tours and averages 75-100 fishing boats a day, according to port officials.
  • Port managers, Army engineers agree to $2.1 million study

    Leadership from the Ports of Longview and Kalama, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have agreed to fund an estimated $2.1 million study. The study will investigate what changes or improvements engineers can make to turning basins in the Columbia River to help larger, deeper-drafting vessels, safely navigate when turning.
  • August

    Commerce flows normally after Army engineers repair John Day Lock

    Commerce is now moving normally along the Columbia River and through John Day Lock after Army engineers completed repairs to damaged guide wheels by 12:30 p.m., August 5. Technicians originally discovered damage to a lower guide wheel on July 25, which initially closed the lock, and then slowed traffic at that point in the river.
  • Heat wave fuels needless drownings, boating deaths in Oregon

    Drownings and boating-related deaths needlessly continue claiming lives in Oregon, recently fueled by a heat wave. The Oregon State Marine Board (OSMB) reported 19 boating-related fatalities in 2021 and the Oregon Health Authority recorded 57 drownings in natural waters in 2020, which is 160% increase from 2019 (35 drownings). Life jackets may have prevented many of these deaths.