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Marines and sailors with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit and USS Bataan Amphibious Ready Group, visited hotspots such as Teatro Massimo, the largest theatre in Italy, during a port visit to the Sicilian city of Palermo, Italy, May 27-30, 2011. During the recent port visit to Palermo, considered to be "the world's most conquered city,"Morale, Welfare and Recreation officials coordinated several tours within the city and across the Sicilian landscape. The Marines and sailors of the 22nd MEU are currently deployed with Amphibious Squadron 6 aboard USS Bataan Amphibious Ready Group and will continue to train::r::::n::and improve the MEU's ability to operate as a cohesive and effective Marine Air Ground Task Force. The 22nd MEU is a multi-mission, capable force comprised of an Aviation Combat Element, Marine Tilt Rotor Squadron 263 (Reinforced); a Logistics Combat Element, Combat Logistics Battalion 22; a Ground Combat Element, Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment; and its Command Element.

Marines and sailors with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit and USS Bataan Amphibious Ready Group, visited hotspots such as Teatro Massimo, the largest theatre in Italy, during a port visit to the Sicilian city of Palermo, Italy, May 27-30, 2011. During the recent port visit to Palermo, considered to be "the world's most conquered city,"Morale, Welfare and Recreation officials coordinated several tours within the city and across the Sicilian landscape. The Marines and sailors of the 22nd MEU are currently deployed with Amphibious Squadron 6 aboard USS Bataan Amphibious Ready Group and will continue to train::r::::n::and improve the MEU's ability to operate as a cohesive and effective Marine Air Ground Task Force. The 22nd MEU is a multi-mission, capable force comprised of an Aviation Combat Element, Marine Tilt Rotor Squadron 263 (Reinforced); a Logistics Combat Element, Combat Logistics Battalion 22; a Ground Combat Element, Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment; and its Command Element. (Photo by Sgt. Josh Cox)

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Corps of Engineers and Wash. Department of Fish and Wildlife employes dewater The Dalles Dam fish ladder.

Corps of Engineers and Wash. Department of Fish and Wildlife employes dewater The Dalles Dam fish ladder. (Photo by Amber Tilton)

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Corps of Engineers and Wash. Department of Fish and Wildlife employes dewater The Dalles Dam fish ladder. Fish remaining in the ladder are collected and returned to the Columbia River.

Corps of Engineers and Wash. Department of Fish and Wildlife employes dewater The Dalles Dam fish ladder. Fish remaining in the ladder are collected and returned to the Columbia River. (Photo by Amber Tilton)

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Corps of Engineers and Wash. Department of Fish and Wildlife employes dewater The Dalles Dam fish ladder. In order to access the ladder employees crawl through holes in the wiers usually used by fish.

Corps of Engineers and Wash. Department of Fish and Wildlife employes dewater The Dalles Dam fish ladder. In order to access the ladder employees crawl through holes in the wiers usually used by fish. (Photo by Amber Tilton)

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Marines and sailors with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit and USS Bataan Amphibious Ready Group, aboard USS Bataan, view the Sicilian city of Palermo, Italy, during a port visit, May 27, 2011. During the recent port visit to Palermo, considered to be "the world's most conquered city," Morale, Welfare and Recreation officials coordinated several tours within the city and across the Sicilian landscape. The Marines and sailors of the 22nd MEU are currently deployed with Amphibious Squadron 6 aboard USS Bataan Amphibious Ready Group and will continue to train and improve the MEU's ability to operate as a cohesive and effective Marine Air Ground Task Force. The 22nd MEU is a multi-mission, capable force comprised of an Aviation Combat Element, Marine Tilt Rotor Squadron 263 (Reinforced); a Logistics Combat Element, Combat Logistics Battalion 22; a Ground Combat Element, Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment; and its Command Element.

Marines and sailors with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit and USS Bataan Amphibious Ready Group, aboard USS Bataan, view the Sicilian city of Palermo, Italy, during a port visit, May 27, 2011. During the recent port visit to Palermo, considered to be "the world's most conquered city," Morale, Welfare and Recreation officials coordinated several tours within the city and across the Sicilian landscape. The Marines and sailors of the 22nd MEU are currently deployed with Amphibious Squadron 6 aboard USS Bataan Amphibious Ready Group and will continue to train and improve the MEU's ability to operate as a cohesive and effective Marine Air Ground Task Force. The 22nd MEU is a multi-mission, capable force comprised of an Aviation Combat Element, Marine Tilt Rotor Squadron 263 (Reinforced); a Logistics Combat Element, Combat Logistics Battalion 22; a Ground Combat Element, Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment; and its Command Element. (Photo by Sgt. Josh Cox)

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Corps of Engineers and Wash. Department of Fish and Wildlife employes dewater The Dalles Dam fish ladder. Fish remaining in the ladder are collected and returned to the Columbia River.

Corps of Engineers and Wash. Department of Fish and Wildlife employes dewater The Dalles Dam fish ladder. Fish remaining in the ladder are collected and returned to the Columbia River. (Photo by Amber Tilton)

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Petty Officer 3rd Class Cuinn O. Poole, center, 23, a corpsman with Combat Logistics Battalion 22, 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, and Panama City, Fla., native, is pinned with the Fleet Marine Force badge, May 24, 2011, aboard USS Bataan.  When a corpsman initially joins a Marine command, the sailor must learn about the mission, capabilities, customs, traditions and history of the Marine Corps in an effort to earn the Fleet Marine Force badge.  The Marines and sailors of the 22nd MEU are currently deployed with Amphibious Squadron 6 aboard USS Bataan Amphibious Ready Group and will continue to train and improve the MEU’s ability to operate as a cohesive and effective Marine Air Ground Task Force.  The 22nd MEU is a multi-mission, capable force comprised of an Aviation Combat Element, Marine Tilt Rotor Squadron 263 (Reinforced); a Logistics Combat Element, Combat Logistics Battalion 22; a Ground Combat Element, Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment; and its Command Element.

Petty Officer 3rd Class Cuinn O. Poole, center, 23, a corpsman with Combat Logistics Battalion 22, 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, and Panama City, Fla., native, is pinned with the Fleet Marine Force badge, May 24, 2011, aboard USS Bataan. When a corpsman initially joins a Marine command, the sailor must learn about the mission, capabilities, customs, traditions and history of the Marine Corps in an effort to earn the Fleet Marine Force badge. The Marines and sailors of the 22nd MEU are currently deployed with Amphibious Squadron 6 aboard USS Bataan Amphibious Ready Group and will continue to train and improve the MEU’s ability to operate as a cohesive and effective Marine Air Ground Task Force. The 22nd MEU is a multi-mission, capable force comprised of an Aviation Combat Element, Marine Tilt Rotor Squadron 263 (Reinforced); a Logistics Combat Element, Combat Logistics Battalion 22; a Ground Combat Element, Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment; and its Command Element. (Photo by Sgt. Josh Cox)

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Corps of Engineers and Wash. Department of Fish and Wildlife employes dewater The Dalles Dam fish ladder. If large sturgeon are found in the fish ladder, employees will use a crane to lift the fish out of the ladder and place it back into the river.

Corps of Engineers and Wash. Department of Fish and Wildlife employes dewater The Dalles Dam fish ladder. If large sturgeon are found in the fish ladder, employees will use a crane to lift the fish out of the ladder and place it back into the river. (Photo by Amber Tilton)

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Corps of Engineers and Wash. Department of Fish and Wildlife employes dewater The Dalles Dam fish ladder. Fish remaining in the ladder are collected and returned to the Columbia River.

Corps of Engineers and Wash. Department of Fish and Wildlife employes dewater The Dalles Dam fish ladder. Fish remaining in the ladder are collected and returned to the Columbia River. (Photo by Amber Tilton)

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Precious cargo at The Dalles Dam

Posted 12/18/2012

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By Amber Tilton
Park Ranger, The Dalles Lock and Dam


The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife employees dewatered the east fish ladder at The Dalles Lock and Dam Dec. 3. Dewatering is done during the winter months so the fish ladders can be inspected and workers can perform needed maintenance or repairs when fish are not migrating. This is important because the ladders are the only channel for fish to get upriver and around the dam.

 

Workers began by lowering bulkheads, or doors, into the ladder to reduce the flow of water and lower the depth. Once the water was at a safe level, the work began.  Employees climbed down into the chilly, 30-foot wide concrete canyon and started directing fish through a maze of weirs toward the downstream exit. This slippery fish ladder is over a third of a mile long, or 1,801 feet. The weirs are staggered every 16 feet, with holes in the bottom to allow fish to swim through. Contrary to what many people think, fish usually swim through the weirs rather than jump over them.

 

Fish that were not guided to the downstream exit were carefully scooped into nets and placed in bags. Once contained, the precious cargo was attached to a rope and pulled out of the ladder. Up top, the staff gently took the package and lowered it over the dam and safely back into the Columbia River. Adult salmonids were released upstream of the dam and juvenile salmonids were released downstream. All other fish were released at the most convenient location except lamprey, which were held for the Nez Perce Tribe for a reintroduction program. Occasionally, a crane was needed to lift large sturgeon out of the ladders. Other fish commonly seen are steelhead, carp and shad.

 

After the fish were carefully returned to the river, The Dalles employees moved forward with the maintenance and repair work in the fish ladder. After the work was finished, the bulkheads were removed and the ladder was ready to again offer a safe passage around the dam.

ImageThe Dalles